Horticultural Sciences Department

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HOS4932 & HOS6932

Course Title: 

Weed Management for Organic and Sustainable Cropping Systems

Credit Hours: 
3 Credits
Course Format: 

Student-centered learning involving lectures, demonstrations, student oral presentations, weed identification, and student-moderated discussions of primary literature read in advance of class.

Course Description: 
Liebman, M., C.L. Mohler, and C.P. Staver. 2001. Ecological Management of Agricultural Weeds. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Upadhyaya, M.K. and R.E. Blackshaw. 2007. Non-chemical Weed Management: Principles, Concepts and Technology. CABI, Wallingford.

Supplemental Texts:

Booth, B.D., S.D. Murphy, and C.J. Swanton. 2010. Invasive plant ecology in natural and agricultural systems. Second edition. CABI Publishing.
Bowman, G. 2001. Steel in the field: a farmer’s guide to weed management tools. Sustainable Agriculture Network, Beltsville.
Håkansson, S. 2003. Weeds and weed management on arable land: an ecological approach. CABI Publishing.
Radosevich, S.R., J.S. Holt, and C.M. Ghersa. 2007. Ecology of Weeds and Invasive Plants: Relationship to Agriculture and Natural Resource Management, 3rd Edition. John Wiley & Sons, New York.
Ross, M.A. and C.A. Lembi. 2008. Applied Weed Science: Including the Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River.
Course Objectives: 

Students will learn how ecological approaches can be utilized to manage weeds in a sustainable manner. In addition, students will develop or improve skills for critically analyzing scientific literature and hone their oral presentation skills by serving as a moderator and by participating in discussions of weed science with peers. Students will polish their research and writing skills by preparing a grant proposal.

Course Instructor: 

Carlene A. Chase
Horticultural Sciences Department
1245 Fifield Hall
Phone: (352) 273-4770
Email: cachase@ufl.edu

Course Instructor Office Hours: 

Thursday 10 AM -12 PM

Friday 3 PM - 5 PM or by appointment.

Course Required Text: 

None

Course Optional Text: 
Liebman, M., C.L. Mohler, and C.P. Staver. 2001. Ecological Management of Agricultural Weeds. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Upadhyaya, M.K. and R.E. Blackshaw. 2007. Non-chemical Weed Management: Principles, Concepts and Technology. CABI, Wallingford.

Supplemental Texts:

Booth, B.D., S.D. Murphy, and C.J. Swanton. 2010. Invasive plant ecology in natural and agricultural systems. Second edition. CABI Publishing.
Bowman, G. 2001. Steel in the field: a farmer’s guide to weed management tools. Sustainable Agriculture Network, Beltsville.
Håkansson, S. 2003. Weeds and weed management on arable land: an ecological approach. CABI Publishing.
Radosevich, S.R., J.S. Holt, and C.M. Ghersa. 2007. Ecology of Weeds and Invasive Plants: Relationship to Agriculture and Natural Resource Management, 3rd Edition. John Wiley & Sons, New York.
Ross, M.A. and C.A. Lembi. 2008. Applied Weed Science: Including the Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River.
Course Grading Policy: 

Grading:

AssignmentPercent of Final Grade
 UndergraduateGraduate
Examinations6060
Discussion moderator-10
Attendance10-
Quizzes1010
Lab reports1010
Grant Proposal/Presentation-20

Grading Scale:

A= 90 to 100
B+= 85 to 89
B= 80 to 84
C+= 75 to 79
C= 70 to 74
D+=65 to 69
D=60 to 64
E= below 60%
Course Policies and Procedures: 

Attendance and participation in moderating and discussions are required. Students are urged to arrive on time to avoid disrupting class. Late assignments and make-up exams are permitted only for excused absences. Acceptable documents for an excused absence include a doctor’s note or a funeral program. Mobile phones must be turned off during class. Discourse during discussions must be polite and respectful.

Course Schedule: 
Student deliverables
Examinations: Three examinations, essay type and short answer responses.
Discussion Moderator: Moderators will select a current journal article (published within the past 5 years) on the assigned topic and make the selected article known to the class at least 1 week in advance. The moderator should provide some background information on the topic gleaned from the article, personal experience, text books, and other refereed publications during a 15 minute presentation and then open the floor for discussion. Prepare 4 to 6 questions to be used in stimulating the discussion.
Quizzes: Students will review assigned video and journal articles and complete a quiz on the
material.
Lab. Report: Students will prepare reports on a two labs initiated early in the semester.
Grant Proposal:
Title
Project Abstract
A summary of the proposal. (250 words)
Statement of Problem, Rational and Justification
Statement of the problem being addressed, rationale and justification for objectives and the impact of the anticipated project. Begin the statement of the problem with: “The purpose of this project is to”. (500 words)
Project Relevance to Sustainable Agriculture
How will the project and the expected results contribute to agricultural sustainability? It is insufficient to just state that your project addresses some aspect of sustainable agriculture. You need to explain HOW your project will address it and make it more sustainable. Ensure that your work – even though it is making a part of a system more sustainable – does not make the whole system or another part of it, less sustainable. (500 words)
Objectives
A numbered list of concise project objectives. (500 words)
Approach and Methods
A brief description of the methods to be used for each objective, numbered according to their corresponding objective. (1000 words)
Timetable
Prepare a timeline that shows when each aspect of the project will be accomplished. (< 500 words)
Literature Cited
List cited literature (< 500 words) Presentation: Students will make a 10 minute PowerPoint presentation of their grant proposals.
Tentative Class Schedule
DateTopics / Learning Experiences
Jan.Wed6Introduction and orientation
 Fri.8Weeds - Ecological Definition, Adverse Effects and Utility
 Mon11Weed life history
 Wed13The National Organic Rule - Permitted Practices: Permitted Pest Management Practices,  NCAT_Permitted Pest Management Practices   
 Fri.15Database Use for Literature Searches
 Mon18NO CLASS - M.L.K. Holiday
 Wed20Preventive Measures - Seed DispersalPrevention - Apper et al, Prevention - Neher et al, Prevention In Crop Weed Seed Control, Seed Dispersal and Prevention
 Fri.22Quiz. Discuss the documentary: What Plants Talk About – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrrSAc-vjG4
 Mon25Weed-Crop Interactions
 Wed27Weed-Crop Interactions - Laboratory 1
 Fri.29Weed-Crop Interactions - Critical Period for Weed Control
Feb.Mon1Cultural Weed Management - Cultural Weed Management
 Wed3Cultural Weed Management - Cultural Weed Management
 Fri.5Cultural Weed Management -  Cultural Weed Management
 Mon8Examination 1
 Wed10Allelopathy for Weed Management
 Fri.12Allelopathy for Weed Management - Alleopathy
 Mon15Quiz. Biofumigation 
 Wed17Mechanical Weed Management - Mechanical Weed Management
 Fri.19Mechanical Weed Management - Mechanical Management of Perennial Weeds
 Mon22Mechanical Weed Management (Titles for Grant Proposals Due) - Tillage and Cultivation
 Wed24Quiz. Weed Mapping with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
 Fri.26Nonsynthetic Mulches -Biodegradable MulchesFully Biodegradable Mulches_Notes
 Mon.29NO CLASS - Spring Break
Mar.Wed.2NO CLASS - Spring Break
 Fri.4NO CLASS - Spring Break
 Mon.7Synthetic Mulches -Synthetic MulchesSynthetic Mulches_Notes
 Wed.9Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation -Soil solarization and ASD
 Fri.11Soil solarization - Solarization and Nutsedge
 Mon.14Thermal Weed Control - Thermal Weeding
 Wed.16Examination 2
 Fri.18Introduction to Biological Control of Weeds - Biological Control of Weeds
 Mon.21Biological Control of Weeds Using Arthropods
 Wed.23Bioherbicides for Weed Control - Biological Control with Plant Pathogens
 Fri.25Quiz. Weed Seed Predation 
 Mon28Livestock for Weed Management -Biological Control with Vertebrates
 Wed.30Livestock for Weed Management
Apr.Fri.1Chemical Weed Control
 Mon.4Soil Fumigants (Proposal Drafts Due) - Soil fumigation
 Wed.6Synthetic Herbicides - Chemical Control of WeedsClassification of Herbicides According to Site of Action
 Fri.8Nonsynthetic herbicides
 Mon11Quiz. Sustainability of Herbicide Resistant Crops
 Wed.13Integrated Weed Management
 Fri.15Student Research Proposal Presentations (Grant Proposals and Lab Reports Due)
 Mon18Review for Exam
 Wed.20Examination 3  
Academic Policy: 

Academic Honesty: Students are expected to adhere to the University of Florida Honor Code: We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Please refer to conduct regulations at http://www.dso.ufl.edu/STG. Violations of Academic Honesty Guidelines and the Honor code, which include cheating, plagiarism, bribery, misrepresentation, conspiracy, and fabrication, will not be tolerated.

Software Use: All faculty, staff and students of the university are required and expected to obey the laws and legal agreements governing software use. Failure to do so can lead to monetary damages and/or criminal penalties for the individual violator. Because such violations are also against university policies and rules, disciplinary action will be taken as appropriate.
Campus Helping Resources: Students experiencing crises or personal problems that interfere with their general well-being are encouraged to utilize the university’s counseling resources. Both the Counseling Center and Student Mental Health Services provide confidential counseling services at no cost for currently enrolled students. 
University Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall, 392-1575, www.counsel.ufl.edu
Student Mental Health Services, Rm. 245 Student Health Care Center, 392-1171, www.shcc.ufl.edu/smhs/
Students with Disabilities: The Disability Resource Center coordinates the needed accommodations of students with disabilities. This includes registering disabilities, recommending academic accommodations within the classroom, accessing special adaptive computer equipment, providing interpretation services and mediating faculty-student disability related issues. 0001 Reid Hall, 392-8565, www.dso.ufl.edu/drc/